The President’s Corner: Science for Peace as a Foreign Language

by Metta Spencer If you join a group such as Science for Peace, you have to learn its culture, which is mostly a matter of learning its language. For most of us, as when we acquired our first language, this learning is a simple, stress-free matter of absorbing the usage that we hear around us. … Read more The President’s Corner: Science for Peace as a Foreign Language

Report of the Working Group on Global Governance

(2016-09-17) Members: Helmut Burkhardt (chair), Norman Dyson, Rose Dyson, Brydon Gombay, Julia Morton-Marr, Tom Simunovic, Peter Venton, Adnan Zuberi Mandate: We believe good global governance is meaningful, feasible and necessary. The time is right for replacing globally the inhumane law of force with the just force of law. A World Federation or an effectively reformed … Read more Report of the Working Group on Global Governance

Report of the Working Group on Non-violence

(2016-10-25) While anti-militarists are skilled in contesting the West’s armed intervention in Iraq and Syria, many of us are far less convincing when it comes to articulating what a non-violent response to conflict in the area might actually look like. The issue seems particularly pressing at this moment, given the ongoing coalition effort — with … Read more Report of the Working Group on Non-violence

Science for Peace Position 2017? NATO, Canada, USA, and Russia

Should Science for Peace, an educational organization promoting non-violence and nuclear disarmament: continue to be silent on Canada’s role in NATO? advocate a security model based on the United Nations rather than NATO? advocate that Canada leave NATO? In 1997 Science for Peace addressed the relationships between Canada, the military alliance NATO (North Atlantic Treaty … Read more Science for Peace Position 2017? NATO, Canada, USA, and Russia

Report of the Nuclear Weapons working group

(2017-01-03) As we begin a new year, the formidable task of eliminating nuclear weapons remains before us. 2016 was intense for anyone following the politics surrounding nuclear weapons, and although it left us with reasons for increased concern, the year also brought us reasons to hope. North Korea’s nuclear tests and Donald Trump’s tweets on … Read more Report of the Nuclear Weapons working group

Skip to content