Wed, Mar 31, 2010: Second Annual Health Studies Research Symposium

Wednesday, March 31, 2010, 5:00-8:00 pm
Room 144, University College
15 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto
Reception to Follow UC240

This is a Free Event Open to the Public & the University Community

Student presentations 5:00- 6:15 pm

Cathy Fournier
Professional status within an interprofessional context: A view of massage therapy

Lucia Fiestas Navarrete
Beyond violence survivorship: Self-efficacy and social capital formation within a circle of Latina survivors of violence

Tomas Krakowski
The evolving social and ethical issues in population-based genomics research

Plenary Speakers 6:30- 8:00 pm

Dr. Tanya Zakrison
Earthquakes, health & man-made disasters: The case of Haïti

Dr. Nancy Olivieri
Academic freedom and the responsibility to protect

For further questions please contact
Health Studies Program at 416-978-8083
Health.studies@utoronto.ca

Sponsored in part by: Science for Peace & Health Studies Student Union

Abstracts of Talks:

Dr. Tanya Zakrison
Earthquakes, health & man-made disasters: The case of Haïti
Dr. Tanya Zakrison (0T3; trauma surgery fellow, Ryder Trauma Center, Jackson Memorial Hospital Miami, USA) travelled to Haïti within 72 hours following the January 12 earthquake. Dr. Zakrison will discuss the issues surrounding the relief efforts, the marginalization of the Haitian people in these efforts and how the consequences of the earthquake in Haïti represents a man-made disaster.

Dr. Nancy Olivieri
Academic freedom and the responsibility to protect
Dr. Nancy Olivieri teaches in the Health Studies Program and was recently awarded the prestigious 2009 American Association for the Advancement of Science “Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award”. As stated on the AAAS web site: “Her long struggle in defending these principles has brought world attention to the importance of scientific integrity for public health and safety.” Dr. Olivieri will speak to the issues of academic freedom and the responsibility it implies for students and academics.

Lucia Fiestas Navarrete
Beyond violence survivorship: Self-efficacy and social capital formation within a circle of Latina survivors of violence
Violence against women constitutes a persistent societal problem best addressed within the scope of women’s health. Existing literature indicates that the impact of violence on the lives of survivor women negatively influences their ability to build trusting relationships with family and friends as well as to maintain reliable networks of trust and support within their communities. Yet, there is a lack of services for victims and survivors that focus on the long-term effects of violence and the preceding factors that determine the experience of gendered violence. This study focuses on the experiential knowledge of Latina women survivors of violence and their perceived emotional and mental health needs. It explores the empowerment and community building opportunities that arise through their involvement in the creation and development of a women’s circle. The study explores how participation in a women’s circle enables Latina survivors to develop an improved sense of self-efficacy, build horizontal networks of trust and accumulate meaningful social resources, which are ultimately indicative of social capital formation. In the future, support groups relevant to abused women in general, and Latina survivors in particular, will be determined by the degree of involvement that survivor women have in the creation, planning, programming, implementation and evaluation of local initiatives. Women, as experts in their own healing and as potential leaders within their communities require an opportunity to create their futures without violence, in fellowship with one another.

Tomas Krakowski
The evolving social and ethical issues in population-based genomics research

Cathy Fournier
Professional status within an interprofessional context: A view of massage therapy