Publications

82.49. Peace And Disarmament Reading List

Members of Science for Peace may find this selection useful for their awn use, but it was compiled for distribution to community groups which we expect will be asking us for help in studying peace and disarmament issues as the November election approaches with the disarmament referendum on the ballot in many municipalities.

A very recent publication might be added: “The Arms Race and Arms Control”, a paperback edition of the SIPRI Yearbook 1982, published by Taylor and Francis at about $8 (SIPRI= Stockholm International Peace Research Institute). Chapters of Science for Peace should write to SIPRI, Bergshamra, S-171 73 Solna, Sweden for the SIPRI Brochure.

82.59. For Reference

  • “Hope from Hiroshima” by Gene Knudsen-Hoffman; “Peace Brigades” by Mark Shepard; “UNSSDII”; “A gathering of many faiths” (International Religious Convocation for UNSSDII); “Bread and peonies” (Blockade the Bombmakers civil disobedience at the UN in June 1982). Fellowship, July/Aug. 1982.
  • “An economist looks at the arms race” (The Innis Memorial Column) by Mel Watkins. This Magazine, Vol. 16, No. 3, July, 1982, pp. 15-19.
  • “Swords into Plowshares: The Cruise Missile Conversion Project” by Murray MacAdam. Canadian Forum, Vol. 62, #720, Aug., 1982, pp. 21,25.
  • “Disarmament: moral vision and practical politics” by Mike Jendrzejczyk. “Puffing up the pentagon: a union view” by Leslie Nulty. Fellowship, June, 1982.
  • “Denial bars disarmament, experts say” (American Psychiatric Association Conference) Globe & Mail, Monday, May 17, 1982, p. C14.
  • “Alternative to war” by William Eckhardt. Manchester College Bulletin of the Peace Studies Institute, 1980, 10 (1), pp. 40-44.
  • “The chance for Canada to become an arms dropout” by Andrew Brewin. Globe & Mail, August 6, 1982, p. 7.
  • “Cracks beginning to show in Soviet armor” Newsday, reprinted in Toronto Star, Sept. 1, 1982.

82.65. Publishing Notices From Ploughshares

The Fate of the Earth, Jonathan Schell: The critics rave about it; the public everywhere is reading it and profoundly moved by it; all that remains is for the nuclear planners to believe it. Jonathan Schell’s The Fate of the Earth, topped New York’s list in hardcover during UNSSODII. Now, Avon Books of Canada has announced the publication of this most important work on the meaning of life and death in the nuclear age in paperback to be released November 1, 1982.

Said Studs Terkel, “There have been books that have changed our lives. This one may save our lives.” Walter Cronkite said, “If it can do for the nuclear sanity movement what Rachel Carsons’ Silent Spring did for the environment movement, there still may be hope to save our civilization.” Project Ploughshares, in cooperation with the publisher, Avon Books, is proud to offer this most famous book of our time, a work of exceptional force that confronts the reality of the potential annihilation of life on Earth by nuclear weapons, at a 25% discount off the already exceptional list price of $2.95 per copy.

When ordering from Project Ploughshares, please make cheques or money-orders payable to the Canadian Council of Churches and send to: Project Plough-shares, Conrad Grebel College, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G6. Orders may also be made directly to the publisher, and must include full payment (less 25% discount) in cheque or money-order ONLY payable to Avon Books of Canada. Send to Avon Books of Canada, Education Department, 2061 McCowan Road, Suite 210, Scarborough, Ontario M1S 3Y6. (Ploughshares Monitor Newsreport, Sept. 1982, p. 7)

The address of Avon Books is Suite 210, 2061 McCowan Road, Scarborough, Ontario M1S 3Y6. Their Education Sales Manager is Peter Austin (416) 293-9404.

82.68. Introducing: The World

Introducing: The World, a world affairs program, is looking for resource people to participate in small group discussions at our Interschool Conference on Friday, November 5, 1982, at The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. The conference is designed to generate interest in global issues among secon-dary school students and teachers. As a resource person, you may expect to help the group identify issues, encourage thoughtful exchanges of views, and provide the perspective of your own experience. No speeches are required; we simply need people who enjoy asking questions of themselves and others. For more information, call Hayley Aplyn or Cheryl Ranson, 923-6641 ext. 408.

82.69. The Fate Of “The Fate Of The Earth”

The Fate of the Earth by Schell belongs to the genre of “political fantasy and millenial daydreaming” in the opinion of Theodore Draper in an extensive review of Schell’s book along with books by Solly Zuckerman and by Bundy, Kennar, McNamara and Smith. This appears in the New York Review, July 15, 1982, pp.35-43. Correspondence anyone?

82.70. “Ideas” On CBC

The radio programme series Ideas (CBC-FM at 8 p.m.) featured in October:

(1) 1982 Massey Lectures: “Indefensible weapon” Robert Jay Lif ton, Yale Univer-sity (Oct. 11-15).

(2) “Nuclear peace”, a 10-part series on War and Peace hosted by Sharon Dunn. Some speakers: Douglas Roche, Richard Falk, E.P. Thompson, Paul Warnke, Inge Thorsson, Christian Bay, Philip Berrigan, Archbishop Hunthausen.

82.71. Nuclear Power & Weapons

On Sunday, October 24, an evening with Amory B. Lovins and L. Hunter Lovins in the Toronto City Hall Chambers will focus on the topic “Nuclear power & nuclea) weapons: breaking the nuclear line. Information: 978-7014.

82.72. Disarmament: The Emerging Global Mandate

From Friday noon, October 22 to Sunday noon, October 24, a conference Disarmament: The Emerging Global Mandate is being held in the Burton Auditorium, York University. Speakers include E. Goussarov, D. Cortwright, H. Scoville,

L. Kristiansen, J. Verigin, M. Laurence, T. Gervasi, A. Eggleton, L. Pauling,

E. Regehr, Rev. L. Wilson, H. Epp. Registration: $25, or $5 per session. Infor-mation: (416) 367-0432 or Operation Dismantle, Box 3887, Station C, Ottawa KlY 4M5.

82.73. American Physical Society Endorses Nas Resolution

In June, 1982, the Executive Committee of the American Physical Society unanimously endorsed the resolution on Nuclear War and Arms Control of the National Academy of Sciences (see item 82.62. in this Bulletin). It was noted that a few of the items on the NAS statement have already been implemented. For several years, the APS has played a role in educating its members and the public on the technical issues involved in the nuclear arms limitation area, via symposia and short courses at its general meeting.

What is your professional society doing?