Now, the CW 'Deterrent'

NGO Forum On CBW Prohibition, 22 May, 1986 at UN Headquarters:

“Over the last five years more progress seems to have been made in the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva in the negotiation of a Treaty to eliminate chemical weapons than in any other area.”

Toronto, 10 May, 1986

The Prime Minister
The Secretary of State for External Affairs
The Defence Minister

We strongly urge that Canada vigorously resist acceptance by NATO Defence Ministers’ Meeting May 22 and 23 of U.S. manufacture of binary chemical weapons. Scientific opinion is strong that such weapons would drastically reduce probability of agreement on treaty banning chemical weapons due to near impossibility of verification. Recent statements by Gorbachev and PRAVDA and recent progress at ad hoc committee on CW give hope time ripe now for advance towards a treaty. Essential not to squander possibility of progress.

George Ignatieff; John Valleau; John E. Dove, On motion of the meeting of the Board of Directors of Science for Peace, 10 May, 1986.

Brussels (Reuter-CP) Defence Minister Erik Nielsen, Canada’s representative at the session (meeting of NATO defence ministers), made a strong plea for NATO unity, urging all members to help Washington “share in the moral burden” of the decision.

Stephen Strauss, The Globe and Mail: “The US navy began its binary program with the 225-kilogram Bigeye bomb in 1965. It was halted in 1969 after 6000 sheep were accidentally killed in the Dugway testing ground in Utah.”

On the US Chemical Arms Proposal:

“It is deemed prudent by all NATO countries that the US increase or modernize its chemical capability for the maintenance of deterrence and peace.” – Harvie Andre to the House of Commons.

The Geneva Treaty on chemical weapons outlaws first use but not research or deployment.