Can we create a low-carbon world?

Ed Milliband, Britain’s Minister of Climate Change, said:

“We know we need to act on climate change, but how? As the science becomes clearer, as we increasingly see its effects, not in the future but around us right now, as global emissions continue to rise, countries around the world are looking for new approaches. Each of us can learn from others.

“In Britain we (have) committed ourselves to a low-carbon future. A Climate Change Act, the first of its kind, means that the greenhouse gas emissions must legally be cut by 80 per cent by the middle of the century.

“Because there will always be short-term pressures facing politicians of the day, the Act included a specific recommendation to be guided by the evidence. An independent Committee on Climate change advised us on the 80 percent target using the latest science, UN reports and conversations with experts here at home. It will continue to give advice on each carbon budget on the path to 2050, and do it publicly so governments in the future will have to explain why any recommendations are not accepted.

“But we know governments alone cannot bring about this shift. For companies cutting carbon emissions must become a necessary part of doing business. Reporting on their carbon impact is a start and for large companies we plan to make it mandatory from 2012, but continued improvements will also take pressure. For communities, green groups and faith groups, there is still a need to press for change.

“We know as well that although determination to change must start at home, it cannot end there: we need a global deal.

“The world meets (this month) in Poland and next year in Copenhagen. With countries sharing ideas and inspiration, with governments and communities spurring each other on, I believe we can get a deal, and we can create a low-carbon world.”
(The Star Nov. 27).

Only in Britain, you say? Pity.

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