Bookshelf

Barry O’Neill, Game Theory and the Study of the Deterrence of War, a paper prepared for the Research Workshop on Deterrence, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, Nov., 1986.

Chandler Davis, Sociobiology’s Claim to Explain Humanity, 1980 draft.

Robert Malcolmson, The Pursuit of Security in the Nuclear Age. The article has just been published in the Autumn Queen’s Quarterly, or you can get a copy of the typescript from the SfP national office.

Robert Malcolmson, Nuclear Weapons and the Averting of War is an October, 1986, Points of View publication of CIIPS. Write the Institute directly, 307 Gilmour St., Ottawa, K2P 0P7.

Anton Colijn and Trudy Govier, Canada’s Participation in NORAD, originally presented to the Standing Committee on External Affairs and National Defence.

The January, 1987 Notices of the American Mathematical Society continues the discussion of military funding in mathematics with the publication of a shortened version of a paper, “Military Funding in Mathematics”, by Bill Thurston, Princeton University. The Bulletin will copy the article for you if you do not have access to the Notices.

Mathematics is not immune to the problems faced by the other sciences in a militarizing society. From 1980 to 1985, according to the National Science Foundation, federal money for research and development shifted from 50% to 28% civilian. Emphasis during the shift has been toward applied research as opposed to basic research which is what most mathematicians think they do.

Arnold Simoni (Toronto) calls our attention to the Science and the Citizen department in the Dec. issue of Scientific American wherein a definitive story about Canada’s Yellow Rain investigations appears. The first study was conducted by physicians from the Dept. of National Defence in 1982, the second by the Dept. of External Affairs in 1984. You can secure the studies from Ottawa, read about them in the magazine, or ask SfP to send you a copy of the article.

THE NERVE CENTER produces material on chemical and biological weapons, issues a newsletter UNMASK, and has other information available. Write Rodney J. McElroy or Susan Schweik, 2327 Webster St., Berkeley CA 94705, U.S.A.

Walter Dorn, The United Nations, Nuclear Disarmament and NG0s, a paper presented in _the Toronto Chapter Lecture Series.

The Pigeon Hill Peacemaking Centre is 1 hour south of Montreal in St. Armand. With tutelage from Rosemary Sullivan (tel: 272-2831 in Montreal, 248-2524 in Pigeon Hill) three week end retreats are planned for the new year: Jan. 5-9, Feb. 13-15, March 20-22. Individualized retreats for peacemakers, teachers, adult educators, counsellors, others in the helping professions can be organized.

IN MEMORIAM: Harrison Brown, editor, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Dec. 9, 1986. Brown,a chemist with the Manhattan Project, developed techniques for separating plutonium for the first atomic weapons. He was a member of the Federation of Atomic Scientists and part of the American delegation to the first Atoms for Peace Conference in 1955.

Emergency Planning Canada has released to 140,000 (less 8000 for the US government) potential Canadian family do-it-yourselfers a guide on how to construct a backyard family shelter against nuclear fallout. The guide reduces to easily understood language the scientific and technical requirements for protection in the event of nuclear war. For instance, materials for use are children’s wading pools, waterbeds, shower curtains and doors with the knobs removed. Write Public Works Canada, Ottawa, for a copy of the 95 page guide.

TOWARD A WORLD OF PEACE: PEOPLE CREATE ALTERNATIVES, Proceedings of the first international conference on conflict resolution and peace studies held at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji. “This book represents an attempt to show how the contributions of 22 fields of study can aid in understanding what may be the most complex of human activities, getting along, with each other and avoiding obliterating ourselves.”

Order from: Dr. J. P. Maas, Conference Coordinator, University of the South Pacific, P.O. Box 1168, Suva, Fiji. Cost: Fiji $14.00. For postage to Canada and the U.S., add Fiji $10.62.